Measuring Continuous Delivery

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Continuous Delivery is a set of principles and practices to improve the stability and throughput of a release process. But what does it mean to be practising Continuous Delivery? What comes beforehand, what comes afterwards, and how many deploys a day do you actually need?

The book Measuring Continuous Delivery by our founder Steve Smith describes how to guide the adoption of Continuous Delivery, using stability and throughput measurements. The book introduces a new term into the lexicon of Continuous Delivery – Discontinuous Delivery.

Discontinuous Delivery is when an organisation has a release process that lacks the stability and speed required to satisfy business demand

An organisation that cannot release product increments sufficiently reliably or quickly for its customers is in a state of Discontinuous Delivery. By applying the principles and practices of Continuous Delivery to its unique circumstances and constraints, an organisation can continuously improve the stability and throughput of its release process until it is in a state of Continuous Delivery.

The definition of Discontinuous Delivery leads to some interesting conclusions:

  1. Business demand must be understood before success criteria for Continuous Delivery can be defined
  2. Continuous Delivery does not ask for a fixed amount of deploys per unit time – 3 deploys a day might be too slow, 1 deploy a month might be too fast
  3. It is possible to move from Discontinuous Delivery to Continuous Delivery and vice versa multiple times, depending on market conditions

Measuring Continuous Delivery contains more detailed information on Discontinuous Delivery, and how to use the Improvement Kata and context of an organisation to successfully adopt Continuous Delivery principles and practices.

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An book on the what, why, and how of measuring Continuous Delivery adoption within an organisation

The latest ebook from our founder Steve Smith is now available – “Measuring Continuous Delivery“.

Measuring Continuous Delivery” covers the what, why, and how of measuring Continuous Delivery adoption within an organisation. It is aimed at executives, managers, practitioners, and anyone else involved in Continuous Delivery adoption efforts.

From the introduction:

Continuous Delivery is a set of holistic principles and practices to reduce time to market and provide an organisation with a strategic competitive advantage, but adoption is invariably a challenging and time-consuming journey. Before adoption, the current time to market and desired time to market are often unknown, which makes alignment and collaboration between individuals, teams, and departments difficult. During adoption practices, techniques, and tools are often introduced without acceptance criteria, with makes it hard to assess and learn from the impact of changes.

What does a successful Continuous Delivery outcome look like, how do we move towards that outcome, and how do we measure our progress along the way?

Measuring Continuous Delivery” is being incrementally published on Leanpub in the weeks and months to come. Buy your copy today!

Buy “Measuring Continuous Delivery”

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An book on the what, why, and how of measuring Continuous Delivery adoption within an organisation

Announcing the latest ebook from our founder Steve Smith – “Measuring Continuous Delivery“.

Measuring Continuous Delivery” will cover the what, why, and how of measuring Continuous Delivery adoption within an organisation. It is aimed at executives, managers, practitioners, and anyone else involved in Continuous Delivery adoption efforts.

From the introduction:

Continuous Delivery is a set of holistic principles and practices to reduce time to market and provide an organisation with a strategic competitive advantage, but adoption is invariably a challenging and time-consuming journey. Before adoption, the current time to market and desired time to market are often unknown, which makes alignment and collaboration between individuals, teams, and departments difficult. During adoption practices, techniques, and tools are often introduced without acceptance criteria, with makes it hard to assess and learn from the impact of changes.

What does a successful Continuous Delivery outcome look like, how do we move towards that outcome, and how do we measure our progress along the way?

Measuring Continuous Delivery” will be incrementally published on Leanpub in the weeks and months to come. Register today and indicate your interest in this book!
Register your interest

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